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could walk into a polling place and show that i'm a member of the united states congress and that would not be enough to get me in those cases the right to vote. you know, this is not just about the immediate legislation. we've always made it hard. we have had this system where for the most part, in most states, the polls closed at 7:00, you had to vote near your home on a weekday or workday. you can't just walk off from your office and say i'm going to go vote. it made it different for people that worked in factories 20 miles from home to participate. >> yeah, if you're working shift work -- i'm going to let you in on it, and we'll talk about the constitutional law of it all. when we come back, is this going to supreme court and what does it mean? stay with us. whoa. right? get. out. exactly! really?! [ mom ] what? shut the front door. right? woop-woop! franklin delano! [ male announcer ] there's oreo creme under that fudge! oreo fudge cremes. now inwo new flavors. >>> think about this statistic. eight of 11 states from the former confederacy have passed restrictive voting laws since t
that a black man was elected president of the united states. it made us proud as americans to know that those prejudices that we've had in the past are falling away. >>> beyond some of the more personal areas, we sat down at campaign headquarters the next morning for a more detailed discussion about where governor romney stands on the key issues of the campaign. so governor we talked last night about the jobs and the economy and also the debt. and i want to begin there. you've called the debt and our deficit a moral crisis. and yet in addition to extending the bush tax cuts you want to cut tax rates an additional 20%. you rejected a 10-to-1 spending ratio when it comes to spending to increasing taxes, and yet you want to balance the budget. the math simply doesn't add up. does it? >> well, actually it does. and the good news is that five different economic studies, including one at harvard, and princeton, and aei, and a couple at the "wall street journal," all show that if we bring down our top rates, and actually go across the board, bring down rates for everyone in america, but also limit
'm no longer in congress. i could walk into a polling place and show i'm a member of the united states congress and that would be not enough to get me in those cases the right to vote. this is not just about the immediate legislation. we've always made it hard for people to vote. the system for where the most part, the polls closed at 7:00, you had to vote near your home, vote on a weekday, a work day. for a lot of people, you can't walk off from your office and say i'm going to go vote. and it made it very difficult for people who worked in factories, 20 miles from their home or whatever to participate. it's a bigger problem. >> if you are working shift work and particularly in an economy -- i will let you in on it and kenji, bring it to the table to talk me through the constitutional laws. when we come back, i want to know, this going to the supreme court? if so, what does it mean? stay with us. ♪ i'd do anything for you, dear ♪ ♪ anything, yes, i'd do anything ♪ ♪ anything for you ♪ hey. hey eddie. i brought your stuff. you don't have to do this. yes i do. i want you to keep this
poor circumstances is now lower in the united states than in most of europe. that should shock us. because those are countries with aristocratic histories, very rigid class systems. yet now you have a greater chance of rising from poor circumstances than in the u.s. and what's so striking, the paradox, is that rubio and other republicans talk about upward mobility and the american dream. but they don't offer any ideas in today's circumstances for what we need to do on public policy to actually increase the odds that we can renew the american dream for the next generation. >> here's what's slightly depressing. you write after listening to president obama's proposals democrats are also, quote, unequal to today's challenges. tell me about that. >> there's no question president obama, the agenda he has from his first term and what he's proposing focus on college costs, k-12 education. it's better than what the republicans are offering because basically all they're doing is cutting taxes, cutting taxes mostly for the best off, despite what mitt romney was trying to allege on "meet the
and credit of the united states was to agree to this deal in which both parties bound themselves to these cuts which is called sequestration. this was the deal. this is what everyone agreed to after this climactic battle. this was the democrats basically appeasing the republicans who had exempted themselves from the normal procedures of governance on the deal of sequestration. now mitt romney is saying this deal is terrible. the president, what a terrible person the president is for signing on to this deal, and my running mate who approved the deal, awful person. and john mccain is running around saying terrible deal. they want to cut defense spending. to me it's like, wait a second, they won't even live up to the deal they themselves made months ago, how can we govern? what is the second term going to look like? >> isn't this part of the problem that obama was facing in this speech? i think a lot of people were disappointed in this speech because one of the things we all loved -- those of us who loved obama in 2008 loved the fact he seemed to lefl with people, he seemed to speak
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5

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